Supersilent 14 (Recording review)

Supersilent

14

Smalltown Supersound
2018

On Friday September 28th, Supersilent – the experimental trio of Arve Henriksen (trumpet, voice and electronics), Helge Sten (Electronics), and Ståle Storløkken (keyboards and electronics) – released a fourteenth album, their second for the label Smalltown Supersound. The group is best known for performances of “slow jazz:” avant jazz that unfurls at a gradual rate. Supersilent 14 revels in slow tempos, as the track “14.7” (embedded below) demonstrates. However, this time out there are a few other components shifted t0 make for a different listening experience.

The recording’s dozen tracks – labeled with numbers and nothing more – are relatively aphoristic, ranging from the horror movie industrial cast of the one-minute long “14.9” to the comparatively spacious and spacey “14.12,” which clocks in at five minutes and thirty-nine seconds. Thus, “slow jazz” tracks and more primarily electroacoustic soundscapes are allowed limited room for development, instead presented as atmospheres that often seem to begin in progress. Some Supersilent releases have hewed towards a lusher palette than 14, which instead tends towards the edgy. Henriksen’s trumpet is frequently distressed and sometimes subsumed by electronics. Sten, who also releases electronica under the name Deathprod, produced and mixed the recording. His approach revels in noise and overtones in nearly equal measure. The result is an impressive amalgam of both ends of the “sound art spectrum.” Occasional moments of recognizable patterning, like the Middle Eastern scalar passages that supply a coda to “14.4,” sounding all the more remarkable for their relative isolation in the proceedings.

At a certain point in their respective careers, most recording artists find it difficult to come up with fresh ideas. With “14,” Supersilent not only seems to have reconsidered their music afresh; they sound like a group just getting started.

 

Death and Vanilla: “Dioz Delerium” (Soundcloud)

Death-And-Vanilla-The-Tenant-MAGENTA

Death and Vanilla have committed a 2015 live performance of the unreleased film score The Tenant (1976) to disc (both magenta LP and CD) for Fire Records (pre-order here). It will be released on February 2, 2018. Check out album track “Dioz Delerium” via the Soundcloud embed below.

Bardo Pond: “Kailish”

Today we are cheering for one of Philadelphia’s finest bands. Bardo Pond will release a new album, Volume 8, on February 2, 2018. We are fortunate that they have decided to share a track from the album ahead of time with us. “Kailish,” a rousing jam riven with flute and distorted guitars, is below.

 

Sakamoto Remixed by Fennesz

ryuichi sakamoto - wing shya
Photo: Wing Shya

Ryuichi Sakamoto’s 2017 recording Async has received a great deal of “deserved” attention, and not only from critics and listeners. A number of musicians have remixed selections from Async, so many that Milan Records will release a compilation of their efforts, Async Reworks, in December. Below, via Soundcloud embed, hear Fennesz’s remix of “Solaris.”

Sakamoto fans can also look forward to his soundtrack for the Korean film Ikari (“Rage”). It will be released on Milan on October 27th. Here album cut “The Site” further down the post, once again via our friends at Soundcloud.

Patricia – “Speed Wagon Night Bride” (SoundCloud)

Out this Friday (7/14) via Ghostly InternationalPatricia’s full length album Several Shades of the Same Color invites the listener into a warmly hued, artfully constructed minimal soundscape. Patricia is the recording name of Max Ravitz, a techno synthesist who has recorded three LPs under the moniker. His advice for listeners is similar to that of minimalist composers such as Philip Glass, LaMonte Young, Steve Reich, and Terry Riley. 

Tip for listeners: consider the moment in which you exist; pay attention to how these sounds evoke physiological (rather than cognitive) responses ….

TALsounds – Love Sick (Bandcamp)

TALsounds

Here’s one well worth repeated listenings: TALsounds’ Love Sick (via Ba da Bing). Analog synths, overdubbed voices, and generous melodic writing all mix together in a heady concoction of synths of yesteryear and the live loops of today.