Friday: Locrian Chamber Players at Riverside Church

CC: Once again, cheering for the home team. Locrian performed my Gilgamesh Suite in 2012. 

Kyburz_4c

Towards the last days of summer, a concert that I eagerly anticipate is Locrian Chamber Players’ August season finale. The group’s mandate is to focus (nearly) exclusively on pieces composed within the previous decade. Artistic director David MacDonald, a composer who teaches at Manhattan School of Music, selects imaginative repertoire.

On August 24th at 8 PM, Locrian will present one of their bravest programs yet. This is due to its cornerstone piece, Réseaux by Hanspeter Kyburz, a formidable chamber sextet A few years ago, I had the pleasure of workshopping it with the composer at Boston’s Goethe Institute. If you don’t know Kyburz’s music – he is not played nearly often enough in the United States – this piece is well worth making it a point to hear.

In addition to Réseaux, Locrian will perform works by Macdonald, Sarah Kirkland Snider, Sebastian Currier, and David Feurzeig. Admission is free, both to the concert and a convivial reception afterwards.

Event Listing

Locrian Chamber Players

Friday, August 24 at 8 PM

Riverside Church – 10th Floor Performance Space

To reach The Riverside Church by subway, take the 1 or 9 train to 116th Street.  By bus, take the M4 or M104 to Broadway and 120th Street.  Enter The Riverside Church at 91 Claremont Avenue (one block west of Broadway, between 120th Street and 122nd Street)

Tickets are not required for this FREE concert.

Michael Mizrahi’s “Currents”

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Currents

Michael Mizrahi, piano

Works by Sarah Kirkland Snider, Troy Herion, Mark Dancigers, Asha Srinivasan, Missy Mazzoli, and Patrick Burke

New Amsterdam CD/DL

Pianist Michael Mizrahi’s sophomore album Currents is out this week via New Amsterdam Records. Below is the considerably charming video introduction to the release, featuring  excerpts from Troy Herion’s Harpsichords. 

 

The title track, by Sarah Kirkland Snider, is a real standout. It adroitly covers a wide swath of both emotional and technical terrain. Thus, it is an ideal solo vehicle for Mizrahi, a pianist who clearly treasures this collection of works, each one filled with abundant variety. And the way that he plays them, he’s likely to make many listeners treasure them too.