9/8 – Righteous Girls and Sirius Quartet at Spectrum

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DOUBLE BILL! RighteousGIRLS (Gina Izzo, flute & Erika Dohi, piano) team up with the Sirius Quartet (Fung Chern Hwei/ Gregor Huebner, violins; Ron Lawrence, viola; Jeremy Harman, cello)

RighteousGIRLS will perform works by Christian Carey, Jonathan Ragonese, Judd Greenstein, Andy Akiho as well as joining forces with Sirius Quartet on works by Pascal Le Boeuf & Remy Le Boeuf and Ambrose Akinmusire.

Sunday, September 8, 7:00pm
Spectrum, 121 Ludlow Street, Floor 2, New York, NY 10002
$15/10 students
http://www.RighteousGirls.com & http://www.siriusquartet.com

Julia Holter – Loud City Song

Julia Holter
Loud City Song
Domino Records

Loud City Song, Julia Holter’s latest full length recording, is her first foray into a professional recording studio. Eschewing the bedroom/laptop pop aesthetic supplies Holter’s music with greater ambience and roomier textures. However, in her case, polished product does not equate to losing creative abandon. Her approach to songwriting and arranging remain restlessly inquisitive and innovative. She even includes two different versions of the same song, “Maxim’s I” and “Maxim’s II.” These demonstrate the reach of her conceptualizing and arranging chops, moving from layered and gauzily atmospheric to pert and focused, delineating discrete vocal/instrumental textures.

Much of Loud City Song certainly is based on pop song paradigms; in that sense it may be some of Holter’s most straightforwardly structured work to date. That said, the comparison is relative. Holter’s credentials as a CalArts trained electronic musician are often cited by those discussing her work, and with good reason. There are still experimental bits peeking out from around corners: a blatting trombone intro, hissed underpinnings, breathy and percussive vocalizing, and tantalizingly elusive synth sounds. Moreover, Holter retains a “composerly” instinct that favors detailed structures and large-scale structural thinking in terms of song order and pacing. Thus far, each of Holter’s records has had a central conceit. As she mentioned in a recent interview (via our friends at Ad Hoc), Loud City Song references Gigi, both the 1944 novel by Collette and the eponymous 1958 musical film.

Rather than merely covering a song from Gigi, Holter instead decides to cover “Hello Stranger,” Barbara Lewis’s biggest hit from 1963. Reverb-soaked vocals and slowly undulating chordal pads give this a very different vibe from the original; sultry and evocative with nary a buoyant “she bop” to be found. This song choice, and its rendering, tease out myriad connections instead of favoring the obvious. On Loud City Song, Holter’s work has retained elusivity, while becoming further refined and even more becoming. Recommended.

-Christian Carey

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