Wendy Richman’s vox*viola project

Singing violist Wendy Richman

My dear friend and collaborator, singing violist Wendy Richman has undertaken a campaign to fund her first solo album, vox*viola. Consisting of pieces for singing violist by Lou Bunk, Christian Carey, Jason Eckardt, Stephen Gorbos, Jose-Luis Hurtado, Everette Minchew, Arlene Sierra, David Smooke, and Ken Uenothe recording will be released via ICE’s TUNDRA imprint on New Focus Recordings

Wendy first premiered my piece, He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven, a Yeats setting, in 2010 at a show that Kay and I presented at Bushwick Starr Theatre in Brooklyn. I selected the text because it was one of the readings at Kay’s and my wedding. In fact, the composition was a first anniversary present to Kay. It is inscribed:

Dearest Kay,

They say that the proper gift for a first wedding anniversary is paper. I hope you don’t mind that mine includes notes. 

All my love,

C

Wendy has been a true champion of the piece, and has since performed it in Ohio and Alabama. Other champions need mentioning: Mezzo-soprano Megan Ihnen and violist John Yuan have performed Cloths of Heaven as a duo and Megan and mezzo-soprano Ellen Broen have also performed a voice-piano version with pianists Graeme Burgan and Jonathan Palmer Lakeland. Megan has even switched roles and performed it in a higher key with a violinist.

 

All of this to say that Wendy’s commission sparked my inspiration, and gave impetus to a piece of mine that has had a larger life than many, and that makes me all the more grateful to her. I am thrilled that she will be recording the piece and am excited by the works that are alongside it on the program; many are by close friends which makes this project feel particularly close-knit. She has made an IndieGoGo page for her funding campaign for the recording. You can check it out here.

 

The Chieftains: “The Foggy Dew” (SoundCloud)

An early photo of Paddy Maloney (center) and the Chieftains

Happy St. Patrick’s Day. Today my parents would have been married 49 years. We miss Dad, especially on this day. He loved the Chieftains more than most music, so I’m sharing one of their best recordings below, courtesy of Soundcloud.

Goldfrapp: “Ocean” (YouTube)

Photo: Alison Goldfrapp

Goldfrapp’s new LP, Silver Eye, is out March 31st via Mute. A more synth-filled adventure this time around, which one can hear on the album’s leadoff track “Ocean.” While not all of their tour is confirmed as yet, there are dates (below) in the New York and Philadelphia areas.

Silver Eye Tour Dates:
20th March – O2 Academy, Oxford – SOLD OUT
21st March – The Junction, Cambridge – SOLD OUT
23rd March – The Leadmill, Sheffield – SOLD OUT
24th March – BBC 6 Music Festival, Glasgow – SOLD OUT
27th March – Roundhouse, London – SOLD OUT
24th April – Theatre Of Living Arts, Philadelphia
26th April – Brooklyn Steel, New York
27th April – Brooklyn Steel, New York 
8th July – Blue Dot Festival
14th July – Latitude Festival

Lindsey Christiansen: An Appreciation

Saddened to hear of Lindsey Christiansen‘s passing. She was a voice teacher at Westminster Choir College, where I teach, for over thirty years.

 

My favorite Lindsey story in which I was involved:

 

We were working on the honors program, Lindsey teaching me how best to advise students (I learned a lot in that meeting).

 

At one point she turned to me and said,”there are some truly brilliant people at Westminster.”

 

She mentioned some of the BHP faculty, then paused and said, “You might be. I’m not sure about you yet.”
Laughter ensued.

 

In our last email exchange, I reminded Lindsey how much she meant to me and so many. She responded, ”I’m glad to have you on my team.”

 

I am sure that Lindsey was a brilliant and guiding light for the students with whom she came into contact. As an institution, Westminster Choir College is impoverished by the loss of her. As a colleague, I feel cheated out of years more to learn from her. And the laughter we shared as we did in that meeting. I will miss Lindsey.

 

New Music Gathering

 

saranoble_highres_headshot
Soprano Sara Noble

I am very pleased to share that soprano Sara Noble and pianist Nadia Shpachenko will be premiering my Ross Gay Songs at New Music Gathering on May 11 at 2:30. This year, NMG will be held at Bowling Green State University.

Pianist Nadia Shpachenko
Pianist Nadia Shpachenko

Performances this week

A couple performances of my work as we move into March.

On Monday, February 27th, singing violist Wendy Richman performed my voice/viola piece “Cloths of Heaven” in Birmingham, Alabama at the Alabama Viola Society’s “Violapalooza” concert at Highlands United Methodist Church. The SoundCloud embed below is of her performance of the piece at Oberlin College in 2016.

Violist Wendy Richman
Violist Wendy Richman
Christ Congregation, Princeton, New Jersey.
Christ Congregation,
Princeton, New Jersey.

On Sunday, March 5th, “Add One More Seat to the Table” will be sung at Christ Congregation in Princeton. It is a hymn that Kay Mitchell and I co-authored. I am grateful to Music Director Joanne Hardgrove and the choir for presenting it during the 10 AM service.

The recording of the hymn embedded below was made by the Wesley Choir of Wesley United Methodist Church in Vienna, VA., directed by Gareth Hayes Bond.

Interview: Sofia Gubaidulina with the BSO

Boston Symphony Orchestra at Symphony Hall in Boston, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. (Photo by Winslow Townson) Andris Nelsons, conductor Baiba Skride, violin Harriet Krijgh, cello Elsbeth Moser, bayan
Boston Symphony Orchestra at Symphony Hall in Boston, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. (Photo by Winslow Townson)
Andris Nelsons, conductor
Baiba Skride, violin
Harriet Krijgh, cello
Elsbeth Moser, bayan

This week, Andris Nelsons and the Boston Symphony Orchestra visit Carnegie Hall for performances from February 28th through March 2nd. They feature the New York premieres of two works. On February 28th, Russian composer Sofia Gubaidulina’s Triple Concerto for violin cello and bayan, featuring violinist Baiba Skride, cellist Harriet Krijgh, and bayan player Elsbeth Moser, a piece co-commissioned by the BSO and Carnegie Hall, will be performed alongside Dmitri Shostakovich’s Seventh “Leningrad” Symphony.

On March 2nd, George Benjamin’s Dream of the Song, featuring countertenor Bejun Mehta and the vocal group Lorelei Ensemble, will be performed along with works by Maurice Ravel (Le Tombeau de Couperin) and Hector Berlioz (Symphony Fantastique). On March 1st, the program consists of the recently departed Gunther Schuller’s Seven Studies on Themes of Paul Klee, Emanuel Ax in Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 22, and Beethoven’s “Eroica” Symphony #3.

With the kind help of a translator (alas, I don’t yet speak Russian), I recently interviewed Sofia Gubaidulina about her new piece and the process of working with Nelsons and the BSO on its premiere.

sofia-gubaidulina

______

For those who aren’t familiar with the instrument, what does the bayan’s repertoire sound like?

In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the bayan played an entirely secondary role–as an accompanying instrument for songs, for light music, for dancing. Its repertoire was folk music. It was only in the twentieth century, really only in the second halfof the twentieth century that the bayan came into its own as an instrument for serious music on the symphonic stage, on a par with the traditional instruments of the orchestra. And that was thanks to the initiative and efforts of superb bayanists dedicated to their instrument, to expanding its repertoire and enhancing its prestige.

You’ve written for bayan and orchestra several times. Which instruments do you like to use to accompany it?

I think string instruments are most congenial in combination with the bayan. There is a natural alliance between these instruments. To be honest, if I had the inclination to pursue this further, I would love to try to combine the bayan with brass instruments,with French horns, for example. There is an episode in this piece where I combined it with trombones. In principle, I love the idea of combining the bayan with brass instruments—with French horns, Wagner tubas. It also sounds marvelous together with percussion instruments. I think it goes less well with woodwind instruments, because the bayan contains all those possibilities already, both the bassoon register and those of flute and oboe. You won’t have the same kind of contrast or enrichment. But I would love to combine it with brass.

How did you decide to write a Triple Concerto using bayan, violin, and cello?

The impetus for this work came from the bayanist Elsbeth Moser, a marvelous musician who is passionately devoted to her instrument and with whom I have worked for many years. Approaching a milestone in her life, she invited seven composers to write works for her. She asked me to write a concerto and specified the solo instruments: violin, cello and bayan. I was delighted to accept; I found the challenge of writing for this combination of instruments and full orchestra very stimulating.

You’ve mentioned that each of your concertos has a different narrative. What is the relationship between soloists and orchestra in the Triple Concerto?

The relationship of the three soloists is very complex. It could be described as an entire cosmos: the upwards, the downwards and the connecting function of the bayan. When a composer fantasizes, it often turns into something that subsequently can’t readily be described in words. The cosmic plan isn’t easily verbalized.

The bayan part here is a very important persona. To employ the metaphor of the trinity, the high and low registers of the violin and cello are united by the bayan playing glissando clusters. The bayan part in this concerto is the root from which a tree grows. The melodic, harmonic and intervallic structure of the piece derives from this tree. The breathing of the bayan is a distinctive property of the instrument. And the tree of the orchestral fabric grows out of this breathing, producing great energy. In other words, the energy that leads upwards develops from this root. This isn’t a virtuoso showpiece with many complex textures. On the contrary, my approach to this instrument—as the root from which everything grows—is very rigorous. The bayan is the persona uniting the high with the low.

How has it been collaborating with Andris Nelsons and the Boston Symphony?

It has been a fortunate circumstance. On the one hand, the young conductor Andris Nelsons is a very deep musician, very deep and talented, with intensely energized pathos. Spiritually, I feel very close to someone like this. So for me the experience has been a happy one. As far as the orchestra is concerned, this is not the first time I have encountered it. And every time I do, my admiration for its musicians is unbounded. The first time I came to Boston, for the performance of Offertorium in 1988, I observed that every musician in the orchestra possessed a distinctive individuality, even those in peripheral roles, say in the rear desks of the violas. It makes no difference: the quality is so high, and the attention to the sound so exacting, that I am a true enthusiast of the orchestra.

What are you composing now?

I don’t want to formulate my next steps because they demand unpredictability.

Boston Symphony Orchestra at Symphony Hall in Boston, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. (Photo by Winslow Townson) Andris Nelsons, conductor Baiba Skride, violin Harriet Krijgh, cello Elsbeth Moser, bayan
Boston Symphony Orchestra at Symphony Hall in Boston, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. (Photo by Winslow Townson)
Andris Nelsons, conductor
Baiba Skride, violin
Harriet Krijgh, cello
Elsbeth Moser, bayan