Arvo Pärt – Musica Selecta

2454|55 X

Arvo Pärt

Musica Selecta

A Sequence by Manfred Eicher

ECM New Series 2454/55 2xCD

For over thirty years, producer Manfred Eicher has been one of the greatest champions of Estonian composer Arvo Pärt. Indeed, the very first ECM New Series release was Pärt’s Tabula Rasa. It seems only fitting that Eicher and ECM would celebrate the composer’s eightieth birthday in handsome fashion. With Musica Selecta, a double-CD retrospective, they certainly have done so.

Called “A Sequence” by Manfred Eicher, it includes seminal early pieces such as Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Britten and Für Alina as well as more recent ones such as Alleluia-Tropus and Da Pacem Domine. Performers often associated with Pärt’s work – conductors Dennis Russell Davies and Tõnu Kaljuste and groups the Hilliard Ensemble, the Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir, and the Tallinn Chamber Orchestra – are represented. It goes without saying that, with such an embarrassment of riches from which to choose, the performances are all exemplary: some iconic. While this serves as an excellent starter kit for those previously unacquainted with Pärt’s music, even those who have some of the New Music CDs would still benefit from hearing Eicher’s sequencing. It is thoughtful and musical: compositional in scope and sympathy. Recommended.

Moving Sounds 2015

GF Haas
 
 
This Friday, the Austrian Cultural Forum New York presents a concert highlighting spectralist composers. The culmination of this year’s Moving Sounds Festival, it features the U.S. premiere of Georg Friedrich Haas’ Introduction und Transsonation, Giacinto Scelsi’s violin concerto Anahit, and pieces by Tristan Murail. Hanna Hurwitz is the violin soloist. Michel Galante leads the Argento Ensemble in these performances.
 
 
 
acf turntables
 
Moving Sounds 2015
Friday September 18 at 7 PM
Bohemian National Hall, Czech Center New York 321 East 73rd Street, NY, NY
Free Event (reservations here)

The New Cello, Volume 2 (CD Review)

Franklin Cox is an indefatigable and prolific figure, both as a performer and as a musicologist. This, the second volume in his “New Cello” series, focuses on European composers. Using Klaus Huebler’s Opus Breve as a refrain, this rondo of nine performances encompasses a great deal of what’s happening in second modernity. Particularly fine are the brief but richly detailed Dove’s Figary of Michael Finnissy, Richard Barrett’s 2-bowed essay Dark Ages, and Claus-Steffen Mahnkopf’s La vision d’ange nouveau. The latter piece is based on an essay by Walter Benjamin written in response to a work by Paul Klee. It is not only rich in literary allusions, but multifaceted in its musical reference points as well, ranging from hyper-virtuosity to string effects to linear and rhythmic polyphony. Cox makes these pieces sound, well not easy, exactly, but more attainable than they truly are by lesser cellists. Still, if that helps them to secure a foothold in the contemporary cello repertoire, even with many hours spent in the practice rooms to obtain it, so much the better.

Tonight at FCM: Copland, Foss, Ives, Bernstein

Lukas Foss

Here is Michael Tilson Thomas, tonight’s guest conductor, with his regular “band,” the San Francisco Symphony, in Aaron Copland’s Orchestral Variations. 

Also on the program, Quintets for Orchestra by my teacher Lukas Foss, Leonard Bernstein’s Prelude, Fugue, and Riffs, and Charles Ives’s New England Holidays.

Julian Anderson

At the Festival of Contemporary Music today, we also heard the premiere of Julian Anderson’s Second String Quartet. A fascinating piece filled with alternate tunings and myriad playing effects, it is one that I will be pondering for a long while.

Here’s a video of a piece that I heard recently, Anderson’s Prayer for solo viola. It was played on a Locrian Chamber Players concert in New York.