Composer News 2020

Westminster Choir

Westminster Choir, conducted by Joe Miller, will be performing my Psalm 96 setting on their West Coast Tour. The choir is celebrating its centenary in 2020 and commissioned the piece to mark the milestone. (Dates below)

Friday, January 10 • 7:30 p.m.
Plymouth Church – United Church of Christ
Seattle, WA
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Sunday, January 12 • 4 p.m.
Cathedral of the Rockies
Boise, Idaho
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Thursday, January 16 • 7:30 p.m.
The Cathedral of the Madeleine
Salt Lake City, Utah
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Saturday, January 18 • 8 p.m.
Christ Cathedral
Garden Grove, CA (greater Los Angeles)
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Sunday, January 19 • 4 p.m.
St. James-by-the-Sea Episcopal Church
La Jolla, CA (greater San Diego)
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Christian Carey: Complete Organ Works 2008-2020

This year, Zimbel will publish my complete organ works (thus far). You may read more about the project in the program notes below.

Christian Carey: Complete Organ Music 2008-2020

Selections

Spiritual Variations I–III

Chanson Variations

Hymn: Add One More Seat to the Table

Prelude on Add One More Seat

Let the Water Rain Down (hymn)

Lullaby Prelude

Lullaby Fugue

Offertorium (Bob Morris)

Postludium (Andy Mead)

Golgotha (Ken Ueno)

Fantasy on Rondeau Carol 

Three and a Half Little Carol Settings

Program Notes

Spiritual Variations I–III were composed for organist Joseph Arndt. Each is based on tunes of American spirituals. Variation 1 features three spirituals, “Brethren We Have Met to Worship (Holy Manna),” “Poor Wayfaring Stranger,” and “What Wondrous Love is This?” Variation 2 is a chorale prelude on “Wherever I May Wander (New England).” Variation 3 is based on “I’m Going to Live So God Can Use Me.”  Using registration creatively to imitate a jazz organ is encouraged in the latter piece.

Chanson Variations is based on my setting of Clement Marot’s  Je suis Aimé de la plus belle, which was an anniversary gift to my wife Kay Mitchell. It was commissioned by the composer and organist Carson Cooman, and was the first in a number of fruitful collaborations between us.

Hymn: Add One More Seat to the Table

Prelude on Add One More Seat

The hymn Add One More Seat to the Table was a collaboration with my wife, poet/playwright Kay Mitchell. It was written to celebrate the retirement of Pastor Jeffrey Mays from Christ Congregation in Princeton, New Jersey. The prelude treats the hymn tune to embellishment and alternate harmonizations.

Let the Water Rain Down (hymn)

Lullaby Prelude

Lullaby Fugue

Let the Water Rain Down is another collaboration with Kay Mitchell, this time a baptismal hymn. It is dedicated to Christ Congregation, Princeton. The pieces based on the tune are a chorale prelude and fugue that contains a number of traditional elements, such as invertible counterpoint and stretto.  

Offertorium (Bob Morris)

Postludium (Andy Mead)

Golgotha (Ken Ueno)

Three pieces in more contemporary idioms that serve as gifts to their dedicatees, composer-colleagues Robert Morris, Andrew W. Mead, and Ken Ueno. Offertorium uses a 12-tone tow found in Morris’s composition Not Lilacs, while Postludium employs two rows found in the music of Mead. Golgotha is the sole work in this volume to use extended techniques, such as hand slaps to blur the pitch material, which are meant to foster gestural angularity typical of Ueno’s music.

Fantasy on Rondeau Carol 

Three and a Half Little Carol Settings

Rondeau Carol was a holiday gift to Kay and I from Carson Cooman. To return the favor, I wrote Fantasy on Rondeau Carol, treating the tune to reharmonizations and melodic variations. Three and a Half Little Carol Settings is a medley for Christmastime. It includes the carols “I Saw Three Ships A-Sailing,” “Bring a Torch, Jeanette, Isabella,” “Sussex Carol,” and a small quotation of another that will be left as a modest puzzle for interpreters. 

Christian Carey has created over eighty musical works in a variety of genres and styles, performed throughout the United States and in England, Italy, and Japan. Organists have played his compositions in many houses of worship, including St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Trinity Church Wall Street, Memorial Church at Harvard University, Princeton Chapel, and Grace Church in Newark, New Jersey. Other compositions have been performed by ACME, Aspen Contemporary Ensemble, Atlantic Chamber Orchestra, C4, Cassatt String Quartet, Chamber Players of the League of Composers, Harvard Choral Fellows, loadbang, Locrian Chamber Players, Manhattan Choral Ensemble, New York New Music Ensemble, Righteous Girls, Urban Playground Chamber Orchestra, Westminster Choir, and Westminster Kantorei. His score for the play Gilgamesh Variations was staged at Bushwick Starr Theatre in Brooklyn. Recordings: New Focus, Perspectives of New Music/Open Space, Tundra, and Westminster. Publishers: GIA and Zimbel.

Carey is Associate Professor of Music Composition, History, and Theory at Westminster Choir College in Princeton, New Jersey. He holds degrees from the Juilliard School (B.Mus. in Voice Performance), Boston University (M.M. in Composition), and Rutgers University (Ph.D. in Music).  He has served as a church musician in a variety of liturgical settings.

Vienna Boys Choir at Carnegie Hall

Photo: Lukas Beck.

Vienna Boys Choir

Carnegie Hall

December 8, 2019

By Christian Carey

NEW YORK – On Sunday, the Vienna Boys Choir performed a Christmas program at Carnegie Hall. It included much standard Christmas fare, both carols and pops selections. However, there were also a number of more substantial pieces, both Renaissance polyphony and 20/21st century music. The superlative musicianship of both the choir and its director/pianist Manuel Huber were impressive throughout, and the flexibility in navigating the various styles of the programmed music seamlessly was noteworthy. 

Although the membership rotates through some hundred members at a given time, with various touring groups and educational activities, the sound of the choir remains distinctive. Unlike English boys choirs, the sound up top is narrower yet retains a bell-like consistency. Several members of the group are in the midst of their voices changing, which allowed for tenor and baritone registers to be accessed in select places. The retention of adolescents not only allows for the group’s larger compass, it is also a compassionate way to treat young people, flouting the long tradition of dismissing choristers whose voices have “broken.” 

The choir entered from offstage singing plainchant. This was followed by a selection of Latin church music by Palestrina, Duruflé, Salazar, and Verdi. The latter piece was the most taxing on the program and the singers navigated it with aplomb. Gerald Wirth has long been the music director for Vienna Boys Choir, arranging and composing pieces for the group. The Sanctus-Benedictus from his Missa-apostolica showed the choir’s voices to best advantage. Canadian composer R. Murray Schafer’s pentatonic vocalization of Gamelan sounds was another winning selection. A nod to America included “I Bought Me a Cat” from Aaron Copland’s Old American Songs, “Somewhere” from Leonard Bernstein’s West Side Story, and Gershwin’s “I Got Rhythm. On the pops selections, choirmaster Manuel Huber provided jaunty accompaniments at the piano with cocktail jazz embellishments.

The second half of the program was divided between carols and pops selections. Es ist ein Rose entsprungen, Adeste Fideles, O Holy Night, and others were performed with gossamer tone and considerable musicianship, putting paid the many stolid renditions one must endure during the holiday shopping season. A new carol to me, Es Wird sho glei dumpa, from Upper Austria, will certainly feature in my own Christmas performances in the future. 

The closing set of pops numbers included “White Christmas” and “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” – it was once again impressive to hear the change in tone the choir was able to adopt between stylistic margins of the program. The inclusion of “Let it Snow,” which is more suggestive than the other pops tunes, marked a questionable choice. Ending with “Stille Nacht” made far more sense for this fine group of young singers.

-Christian Carey

Tallis Scholars: new CD, Concerts in Princeton and New York

Now in their forty-sixth year of singing, the Tallis Scholars, directed by Peter Phillips, have long made an annual December concert at Church of St. Mary the Virgin in midtown Manhattan a stop on their winter tour. Part of Miller Theatre’s Early Music Series, these concerts have focused on Renaissance polyphony, but there have also been some noteworthy new works on the programs. They frequently program the music of Arvo Pärt. Last year’s concert featured the premiere of a piece for the Tallis Scholars written by Nico Muhly.

However, this year an imaginative program, titled “Reflections” is on offer that interweaves selections based on different liturgical sections, bringing together composers from England and on the Continent active throughout the Renaissance as well as twentieth century French composers Francis Poulenc and Olivier Messiaen.

The group is nearing the completion of its edition of Josquin’s Masses. Their latest recording of Missa Mater Patris and Missa Da Pacem (Gimell CD, 2019), presents pieces whose attribution has been the matter of some controversy. The former mass is based on music by Brumel, which would be the only such borrowing by Josquin, contains some uncharacteristic blocks of homophony at strategic places and fewer of the composer’s signature imitative duos. So, is it a misattribution? Without stating anything categorically, in his characteristically erudite liner notes Phillips suggests the Brumel connection might place the mass in 1512 or 1513, shortly after Brumel’s death as an homage to a composer friend; this would make it one of the last two mass settings we have by Josquin. The source material might help to account for the different approach.

Whether Josquin wrote it or someone else, Missa Mater Patris contains some much fine music that is superlatively sung on the Gimmell CD. The Hosanna sections of the Sanctus and Benedictus, borrowing cascades in thirds from the Brumel motet, is both fleet and exuberant. The Agnus Dei III is another section where the contributions of Brumel are expertly integrated.

Phillips relates that, from the nineteenth century to relatively recently, Missa Da Pacem was held up as an example of the Josquinian style. Recent discoveries have suggested another author, Noel Bauldeweyn (Beauty Farm recently released a fine disc of this lesser known composer’s masses). Phillips is not entirely willing to concede that Da Pacem isn’t Josquin’s, he instead mentions passages that seem to point to one and then the other author and leaves the listener a chance to judge – and savor – for themselves.

CONCERT DETAILS

PROGRAM

Salve Regina

Chant: Salve Regina

Padilla: Salve Regina

Poulenc: Salve Regina

Cornysh: Salve Regina

Ave Maria

Chant: Ave Maria

Cornysh: Ave Maria

Poulenc: Ave Maria a10 (arr. Jeremy White)

Miserere

Allegri: Miserere

Croce: Miserere Mei

O sacrum convivium

Tallis: O sacrum convivium

Messiaen: O sacrum convivium

Magnificat

Byrd: Magnificat from Short Service

Victoria: Magnificat Primi Toni 

Princeton, New Jersey, USA

McCarter Theatre

December 13, 2019, 8 PM

Church of St. Mary the Virgin, New York, USA

December 14, 2019, 8 PM

Two new recordings feature Carey compositions; new choral pieces

Out on Friday, December 6th, via New Focus Recordings, Wendy Richman’s Vox/Viola recording includes a piece I wrote for her in 2010, “He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven.” The CD significantly enlarges the repertoire for singing violists, with pieces by Ken Ueno, Everette Minchew, Arlene Sierra, Jason Eckardt, and others.

Wendy Richman, singing violist.

Recently released on Westminster Choir College’s label, Composers at Westminster features music by five faculty composers: Joel Phillips, Stefan Young, Jay Kawarsky, Ronald Hemmel, and myself. Westminster Kantorei, conducted by Amanda Quist, recorded two of my Magnificat Antiphons for the project. Soprano Victoria Browers and pianist J.J. Penna recorded three of my Jane Kenyon Songs for the recording as well. It is available to stream/download on all major platforms (such as Presto Classical).

In other news, Joe Miller commissioned a Psalm 96 setting from me for Westminster Choir, to celebrate the ensemble’s centennial in 2020. It has received three East Coast performances, will be performed at Westminster’s homecoming concert, and then will be programmed on the choir’s West Coast tour in early 2020.

The Princeton Packet previewed the concert and then reviewed the concert.

” For its 100th anniversary season, the Choir commissioned Westminster Choir College professor Christian Carey for a new work; his setting of Psalm 96 (“Sing to the Lord a new song”) was fitting for the occasion both in text and music. Receiving its second performance in this concert, Carey’s piece pays tribute to Westminster Choir’s rich tradition of church music and showed off well the Choir’s well-blended sound and ability to shift harmonies smoothly. “

  • Nancy Plum, Princeton Packet, November 13, 2019.

I’m currently at work on a short choral piece for Manhattan Choral Ensemble, to celebrate the group’s twentieth anniversary. My wife, Kay Mitchell, has written the lyrics.

Release Day! Composers at Westminster Recording

On Friday, October 25th, Westminster Choir College’s recording label, distributed by Naxos, will release “Composers at Westminster,” a digital recording of works by the composition faculty. It includes music by Stefan Young, Joel Phillips, Jay Kawarsky, Ronald Hemmel, and Christian Carey.

Three of the college’s choirs, conducted by Joe Miller, James Jordan, and Amanda Quist, as well as Victoria Browers, a member of the voice faculty, accompanied by pianist J.J. Penna, are among the performers on the recording.

You may listen to a stream or download the music via this link.

Westminster Choir Premieres New Carey work

This past summer, Joe Miller, Director of Choral Activities at Westminster Choir College, commissioned a piece from me to celebrate the centenary of both the college and Westminster Choir. They will premiere my setting of Psalm 96 on November 9th in Massapequa, New York and November 10th in Princeton (Details below).

Appear and Inspire: 100 years of Singing
Westminster Choir
Joe Miller, conductor

Saturday, November 9, 2019, 7:00 PM
St. Rose of Lima, Massapequa, NY

Sunday, November 10, 2019, 3:00 PM
Bristol Chapel, Westminster Choir College

Program Note

This setting of Psalm 96, “Sing to the Lord a New Song,” was written to celebrate the centenary of Westminster Choir College and Westminster Choir. It seemed to be an especially appropriate text to celebrate the college’s rich tradition of music-making and express hope for its continued vitality. As a composer, I always wish that choirs will undertake “new songs” and am most pleased that Joe Miller and Westminster Choir have agreed to perform one of mine. It was composed in August and September 2019 in New Jersey and Tennessee.

Christian Carey has created over eighty musical works in a variety of genres and styles, performed throughout the United States and in England, Italy, and Japan. His compositions have been performed by ACME, Aspen Contemporary Ensemble, Atlantic Chamber Orchestra, C4, Cassatt String Quartet, Chamber Players of the League of Composers, Harvard Choral Fellows, loadbang, Locrian Chamber Players, Manhattan Choral Ensemble, New York New Music Ensemble, Righteous Girls, Urban Playground Chamber Orchestra, and Westminster Kantorei. Recordings of his work appear on New Focus, Perspectives of New Music/Open Space, and Westminster Choir College labels. GIA publishes his choral music and an edition of his organ music is currently in preparation for Zimbel. 

Carey is Associate Professor at Westminster Choir College. He holds degrees from the Juilliard School (B.Mus. in Voice Performance), Boston University (M.M. in Composition), and Rutgers University (Ph.D. in Music).

Black Marble – “Feels” (Video)

Black Marble – Bigger Than Life (Sacred Bones, 2019)

Black Marble (Chris Stewart) will release his third album, Bigger Than Life, on Sacred Bones Records this Friday, October 25th. Stewart leans on synth-pop sounds and styles heavily, but the music sounds freshly earnest and eminently tuneful rather than merely derivative. Check out standout songs “One Eye Open” and “Feels,” and then stream the rest, via the Bandcamp embed below.

Black Marble is touring in November (dates below).

BLACK MARBLE – November Tour Dates

Nov 2 Los Angeles, CA SUBSTANCE at the Los Angeles Theater

Nov 5 TUCSON, AZ Club Congress

Nov 7 Austin, TX Levitation at Empire Control Room

Nov 8 Oklahoma City, OK 89th Street

Nov 9 Memphis, TN Hi-Tone

Nov 10 Nashville, TN The Basement

Nov 12 Columbus, OH Ace of Cups

Nov 13 State College, PA Webster’s

Nov 14 Oberlin, OH Oberlin College

Nov 15 Toronto, ON Eisbaer 2019

Nov 16 Montreal, QC Bar Le Ritz

Nov 19 Hamden, CT Space Ballroom

Nov 20 Philadelphia, PA Underground Arts

Nov 21 Baltimore, MD Metro Gallery

Nov 22 New York, NY Bowery Ballroom (Record Release Show) w/ Automatic

Nov 24 Washington, DC Black Cat